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Saturday, November 3
 

3:35pm

Automated open data-driven language learning in MOOCs
The open source FLAX [1] language project team have developed an application called F-Lingo [2]. Implemented as a Chrome extension, F-Lingo works on top of FutureLearn – an online MOOC platform – to help you learn about selected words, phrases, and concepts in the text you're reading. This presentation will introduce the F-Lingo Chrome extension currently under study with learners enrolled in FutureLearn’s Practical Data Mining [3] courses. This study aims to address whether integrating language tools into an online MOOC platform can supplement learning.

Once F-Lingo has identified keywords, phrases, and concepts within text, it provides an interactive interface for gaining further information about each, such as definitions, example sentences, and related collocations. For keywords, definitions are retrieved from Wiktionary and example sentences are derived from both the content of the course and the British Library’s Open Access E-theses collections [4]. For phrases, both example sentences and related collocations are derived from the FLAX Wikipedia collection. Finally, concept descriptions and related concepts are retrieved from Wikipedia using the Wikipedia Miner toolkit [5].

F-Lingo has been developed by Jemma König in her PhD project at the University of Waikato in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Using it will help her gather experimental usage data for her PhD. If you want to see what F-Lingo does without installing it, this 3-minute video on YouTube [6] illustrates its facilities.

[1] flax.nzdl.org
[2] https://chrome.google.com/webstore/search/flingo
[3] https://www.futurelearn.com/programs/data-mining
[4] http://flax.nzdl.org/greenstone3/flax?a=b&rt=r&s=ClassifierBrowse&cl=CL1&c=PAAH&if=flax
[5] D. Milne and I. H. Witten, “An open-source toolkit for mining Wikipedia,” Artificial Intelligence, vol. 194, pp. 222-239, 2013.
[6] https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=58&v=FRGwuexvkus

Speakers
avatar for Alannah Fitzgerald

Alannah Fitzgerald

PhD Candidate, Concordia University
I am an open education practitioner and researcher with the open-source data-driven Flexible Language Acquisition project (flax.nzdl.org) at Waikato. Being somewhat nomadic, I have gained experience and understanding from learning, teaching and researching across different educational... Read More →


Saturday November 3, 2018 3:35pm - 4:45pm
Accolade East 002

3:35pm

Figuring Out Git and GitHub
Git and GitHub are powerful tools for collaboration, but both have a steep learning curve. I am an certified instructor with the Carpentries and I have taught the Git lesson several times. I'll give you a gentle introduction to version control and how you use Git for your own projects, but more importantly how to use it to collaborate.

No previous experience required - I will get you up to speed. I'm also happy to answer your Git questions or if you are a Git expert please come along and help teaching others.

If you have a Mac or a Linux laptop - git is already installed. If you have a Windows laptop, you can download Git for windows https://gitforwindows.org

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Childs

Stephen Childs

Sr Institutional Analyst, York University


Saturday November 3, 2018 3:35pm - 4:45pm
Accolade East 013 (Area 2)

3:35pm

Free and open educational resources for Afghanistan
Darakht-e danesh' means "knowledge tree" in Dari, one of the official languages of Afghanistan. The Darakht-e Danesh Online Library for Educators is a repository of open educational resources for teachers, teacher trainers, school administrators, literacy workers and others involved in furthering education in Afghanistan. These open source resources include lesson plans, pedagogical tools, exercises, experiments, reading texts, work books, curricula and other resources for use in Afghan classrooms.

In this session, an overview of Education system in Afghanistan and our work on OER will be explained. Additionally, we will share our methodologies in the ground, our successes and challenges. We also will share what we want to achieve next in Afghanistan on Open Education, Open Access and OER and how the community in OpenCon can help us achieve these goals.

Speakers

Saturday November 3, 2018 3:35pm - 4:45pm
Accolade East 011 (Area 1)

3:35pm

Get your Campus on Board: Create an OER Steering Group
There are people all across your campus who care about the world of Open - but how do you get them in all in the room to start making changes on your campus? n this session, we will going over what it takes to get staff, students and faculty on board to create a Open Educational Resources/ Open Education Steering Committee. As the Students' Union VP Academic, and the Chair of our Campus OE Advocacy Group, I have the unique perspective of the student aspect of OER, but it's challenging to see all perspectives. In this session, we will go over what the different stakeholders want to hear, and how to get them on board to help integrate OE changes on your campus.

Speakers
avatar for Akanksha Bhatnagar

Akanksha Bhatnagar

VP Academic, University of Alberta Students' Union
Akanksha is the 2018-19 Vice President Academic at the University of Alberta and the Chair of the University of Alberta Open Education Advocacy Group. In this role, she represents to 32,000 Undergraduate students to the internal university through the variety of committees she sits... Read More →


Saturday November 3, 2018 3:35pm - 4:45pm
Accolade East 011 (Area 2)

3:35pm

How can Open Research and Open Education keep us from drowning in plastics?
The first man-made plastics were invented in 1839, and in the 179 years since, hundreds of different plastics have been created and are being used across all industries from agriculture to aviation. Plastics are one of the most important material class on the planet, but they also the most environmentally destructive one too.

New kinds of ‘bio-plastic’ have been developed to tackle some of the problems with plastics but the products we buy often aren’t what they are cracked up to be.

Could there be ways to get around this confusion about plastic by encouraging open research and open education in this field? Join me in discussing potential opportunities to save us from plastic pollution.

Speakers

Saturday November 3, 2018 3:35pm - 4:45pm
Accolade East 012

3:35pm

How might we remove the 'luck' factor (e.g., influence of where one was born, family wealth, etc.) in receiving proper education?
Most of the well educated people acknowledge the role "luck" has played in them receiving proper education. Whether it is being born and raised in a developed country with a proper educational system or growing up with wealthy parents who invested in their children's education or others. However, other individuals born in less some developing countries which do not invest much in education or whose parents did not really have the funds required to educate them in the current expensive educational system were less lucky in that manner. This issue may have hindered a lot of potential brilliant minds in receiving proper education that would have enabled them to contribute to the development of our species, as the saying goes 'maybe the next Einstein or Steve Jobs is somewhere in Africa or Asia or somewhere else not having access to proper education'.

In this challenge, I would like to brainstorm with the attendees on ideas that may dilute this luck factor and allow for proper education being available for everyone. We will follow the Design thinking approach and hope to come up with a project that tackles this issue.


Saturday November 3, 2018 3:35pm - 4:45pm
Accolade East 009 (Area 2)

3:35pm

Open Access and Intergovernmental Organisations
While much of the discussion around open access focuses on scientific research, free and meaningful access to reports and data produced by governments is an important part of the picture. In the case of intergovernmental organisations in particular, there are four main benefits from open access to the works they produce: greater transparency around decision-making; support for research, jobs and growth; the moral justice of the public being able to access works for which they have paid; and the example set to national governments.
Some IGOs, such as UNESCO or the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO), have been leading the way with open policies. However, there’s still many IGOs whose policies are far from being open.
Stephen Wyber, manager of policy and advocacy at IFLA, has done research to map existing policies on OA and IGOs. He has identified where each stands regarding open access policies. IFLA is planning to release a statement shortly, pointing out the issues and providing recommendations for next steps. IFLA will also continue advocating for open policies within IGOs.
During this UNCONFERENCE session, I will briefly present some of the results from the study and will welcome discussion around ideas on the questions and challenges the topic raises, experience from participants in advocacy, and discussion around the next steps.

Speakers

Saturday November 3, 2018 3:35pm - 4:45pm
Accolade East 013 (Area 1)

3:35pm

Open Humanities & Social Sciences Annual Meeting
This will be the third annual meeting of the OHSS advocacy group, where OpenConners working in the humanities and social sciences come together to share they work, reflect on the unique challenges in our disciplines, and identify action we can take together to strengthen our presence in the Open movement. All are welcome!

Speakers
avatar for Zoe Wake Hyde

Zoe Wake Hyde

Assistant Director, Rebus Foundation
I’m an open publishing advocate, working to create a more inclusive and equitable knowledge ecosystem through technologies and processes that support significant and sustainable change in educational and academic publishing.


Saturday November 3, 2018 3:35pm - 4:45pm
Accolade East 010

3:35pm

Open Materials and Reproducibility
The goal of this discussion is to brainstorm how might we make useful physical research materials more accessible to others and to help ensure that the use of these materials are reproducible. How might we incentivize researchers to not only make their published (or unpublished) biological materials more visible and readily available to others but to also ensure that the necessary protocols and data are associated with these physical materials?

Speakers

Saturday November 3, 2018 3:35pm - 4:45pm
Accolate West 002

3:35pm

Opening Up Online Video: Finding a Home
Whether it's finding and creating great OER, teaching others the skills needed to do Open Science, or just talking about OA in an engaging way with the wider global community, there's a place on online video platforms for Open.

This session is is a great opportunity for people who are interested in using online video to come together and talk about what it is, the barriers that exist to using it, and how to get started with it. We won't talk just about the platform or medium, but the cultures, genres, and communities that exist in and around it, and how OA initiatives can find their niche in each of them. We'll also cover the resources out there created to help you succeed in getting started.

Toward the end of the session, we'll move from just talking about it to actually doing it -- attendees who want to will be able to participate in the creation of an "Open PSA," where they introduce themselves and talk a little bit about what they do and why they care about OA. These will be edited together and uploaded to the facilitator's YouTube channel, Stacks & Facts (a channel about library and information science).

Speakers
avatar for Peter Musser

Peter Musser

MLIS Student, University of British Columbia
Using online video as an outreach and reference tool, digital libraries as learning tools for the classroom, YouTube things!


Saturday November 3, 2018 3:35pm - 4:45pm
Accolade East 006

3:35pm

Opening Up the Hidden Curriculum of the Open Movement
Entering the open community can be a whirlwind of new jargon, people, and practices. What is “scholarly communication”? Are “APCs” a good thing or bad? Which of the many conferences and journals with “open” in the name are worth your often-scarce time and resources?

New practitioners and advocates need to learn new terms, but also must master a “hidden curriculum” of cultural expectations and invisible systems similar to the invisible curriculum that first-generation students navigate as they enter higher education: https://www.chronicle.com/article/We-Must-Help-First-Generation/244830

This session invites you to a conversation about what that curriculum is and how we can teach and improve it. A team of librarians is developing an OER that will introduce the nuts-and-bolts of Scholarly Communication (https://lisoer.wordpress.ncsu.edu) but this movement is designed to center new voices and move beyond traditional and received practices. How can we move beyond the limited perspectives of those (mostly white, North American, R1-focused) authors to create a more inclusive and transformative open educational resource? Join the conversation to share your own experience and help us think about how to welcome everyone and support a more inclusive open movement.

Speakers

Saturday November 3, 2018 3:35pm - 4:45pm
Accolate West 003

3:35pm

Ping pong balls for people power! (or “How might we raise awareness of open practices or issues in fun and inclusive ways?”)
Why did a Syrian drop ping pong balls down the staircases of Damascus? Who is Jorge Cham and how did he get half a million people to subscribe to his thoughts? Are you part of the OpenCon Rebel Alliance?

To change a culture, we must first raise awareness of an issue and increase participation in the discussion, creation and adoption of potential solutions. There are many strategies and tactics for raising awareness, and at OpenCon we appreciate the importance of considering diversity, equity and inclusion when we plan for new engagement strategies and campaigns.

In this session, we will find out about strategies used in political campaigns, on social media and by non-violent direct action-based resistance movements. We will share the issues we are trying to raise awareness of. We will identify who we are trying to engage with and explore their needs and motivations. We will have fun coming up with our own ideas for fun, humorous, inclusive and engaging ways to raise awareness of open issues, inspired by campaigns that have toppled power structures!

This unconference is a workshop session leading into the doathon challenge: “How might we raise awareness of open practices or issues in fun and inclusive ways?”

Speakers
avatar for Naomi Penfold

Naomi Penfold

I have a PhD in neuroscience and now work to encourage the adoption of preprints in the life sciences through community building and support as Associate Director of ASAPbio


Saturday November 3, 2018 3:35pm - 4:45pm
Accolade East 008

3:35pm

Publishing with open access journals
Everyone want to publish the research in journals but why many of them dont go with open access journals what is problem ? how to identify to fake predatory journals. This session may be answer of all question

Speakers
avatar for Vrushali

Vrushali

I am DOAJ Ambassador of India and also working as Librarian at AISSMS COE Pune


Saturday November 3, 2018 3:35pm - 4:45pm
Accolade East 009 (Area 1)

3:35pm

Transforming Scholarly Publishing in University Networks
A brainstorming session on how to increase communication and community between students/staff/researchers within University networks and publishers to promote an open culture and open publication as the default scholarly communication model. For example: The University of California system provides research infrastructure for over 30 universities across California. Through policy and infrastructural changes we can influence the dominant model of scholarly communication at the level of R1 institutions to promote openness within university networks. Lets brainstorm the problems and solutions researchers and universities face when building this infrastructure.

Speakers

Saturday November 3, 2018 3:35pm - 4:45pm
Accolate West 009

5:00pm

Building Communities to Build Open Textbooks
This session is for anyone interested in creating open textbooks and will consider how we can leverage the power of community to make creation easier and more inclusive. We'll also reflect on what's missing in terms of support/infrastructure for communities of creation in open ed and how we might address those shortcomings.

Speakers
avatar for Zoe Wake Hyde

Zoe Wake Hyde

Assistant Director, Rebus Foundation
I’m an open publishing advocate, working to create a more inclusive and equitable knowledge ecosystem through technologies and processes that support significant and sustainable change in educational and academic publishing.


Saturday November 3, 2018 5:00pm - 6:10pm
Accolade East 012

5:00pm

By sharing freely, are we feeding the monsters?
Good intentions do not always develop into good results. What are the limitations or drawbacks of open access to data?
Open access may allow companies to by-pass the trade of data because data would be freely available. Machine learning techniques and artificial intelligence are becoming more and more powerful in finding patterns to predict people's personality and drive their future choices when buying or voting.
How might policy and legislation protect us from unknown unintended misuses of the knowledge we share? Is legislation and policy about open access advancing at the right pace?
We especially invite policy makers to contribute to the discussion with their perspective.

Speakers

Saturday November 3, 2018 5:00pm - 6:10pm
Accolade East 006

5:00pm

Co-creating a "Decolonizing Open Scholarship" Zine
Zines are DIY, self-published booklets: they are a way of sharing ideas through writing, art, or comics! We'll talk about zine-making as a tool for political education, and go over some techniques for creating them.

We'll then start to work together on a (fun! openly licensed!) DIY resource booklet zine that cover concepts around race, accessibility, power, privilege, and colonialism in the context of open research and OER—and highlight projects/initiatives at the intersections of these topics.

This zine will aim to build off the "Critical Approaches to Open Scholarship" reading list that was part of the OpenCon 2017 do-a-thon. This document was meant to be a community-sourced compilation of blog posts, articles, comics, or other media that offer a critical, anti-oppressive take on various aspects of digital information sharing, open scholarship, libraries and higher-ed more broadly. You can find it here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1UntfqcGgsg47--caFFNjksZ7N2zBmnBD1nLdjYTokQQ/edit#

Speakers
avatar for Lorraine Chuen

Lorraine Chuen

Design and Communications Consultant
Lorraine Chuen is a communications professional and visual designer based out of Toronto, Canada.


Saturday November 3, 2018 5:00pm - 6:10pm
Accolade East 010

5:00pm

Dance your Open Story
How might we communicate the importance of open scholarship to a broader audience ?

Dance is a powerful tool to convey ideas and to reach people. Complex scientific ideas have been communicated to non-specialist audience using dance (e.g. Dance your PhD contest). Hence, communicating vocabulary and concept of open scholarly practice in the form of dance, can engage broader audience. This experimental session will focus on expressing ideas of open scholarly practices through dance, collaborative choreography and improvisation theatre. We will collaboratively choreograph few steps aimed at reducing the knowledge gap in open scholarship vocabulary through performing arts. This unconference session is aimed at brainstorming and hence is not limited to participants with interest in dance and other performing arts. Participants interested in conveying ideas to engage public audience but are shy with dancing or have interest working behind the scenes are strongly encouraged to join. This exercise will result in a do-a-thon to create outreach content aimed at communicating the importance of open scholarly practice for a wider audience.

Speakers
avatar for Vinodh Ilangovan

Vinodh Ilangovan

Research Fellow, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry
I am a biomedical scientist working on biological clocks and sleep. I think about Open Science, Open Peer Review and Open Data as a means to achieve reproducibility in research. I am interested on how early career researchers can steer the evolution of research evaluation. I will... Read More →


Saturday November 3, 2018 5:00pm - 6:10pm
Accolate West 003

5:00pm

Decolonizing Scholarly Communication
What does it mean to decolonize scholarly communication? What are some issues, structures, and habits that we can make visible?

This is an informal discussion and all participants are welcome.

Speakers
avatar for Charlotte Roh

Charlotte Roh

Scholarly Communication Librarian, University of San Francisco


Saturday November 3, 2018 5:00pm - 6:10pm
Accolade East 010

5:00pm

Ditching Journal Impact Factors and Journal Blacklists For Good
Let’s talk and move toward action. Set up: The number of journals is increasing rapidly. Publishing infrastructure is increasingly accessible. Journals continue to aim for bench markers set by large, traditional publishers. Beall’s list has been revised and republished by others. Cabell’s—a subscription journal index—now has 10,000 journals on a “blacklist.” How might we rethink journal “quality” in a way that benefits authors, editors, and libraries without duplicating the faults of the past?

Speakers
avatar for Emma Molls

Emma Molls

Publishing Services Librarian, University of Minnesota
I work with University of Minnesota Libraries to publish scholarly content in an open environment.


Saturday November 3, 2018 5:00pm - 6:10pm
Accolade East 013

5:00pm

How do we motivate and mobilize a diverse group of volunteers in Open projects (e.g. open source, open knowledge)?
Volunteer-dependency has been a key characteristic for Open source projects. Whether it is through contributing on Github, creating open geographic data on OpenStreetMap, or editing Wikipedia, volunteers are the backbone in many Open initiatives. Consider the following questions:
* How might we expand our volunteer recurecruit network and improve the recruitment practices to encourage those who do not typically participate in Open (source) projects?
* How do we ensure a diverse, inclusive, and safe volunteer environment/community for those underrepresented within the projects to join?
* How do we reduce and resolve volunteer conflicts to maintain volunteer retention?
* How do we encourage those who bear high opportunity cost to volunteer for free to still join the initiatives? (E.g. consider a marginalized group in the society whose input and participation could be invaluable to Wikipedia editing... Or a group of refugees who struggle financially but can contribute to the OpenStreetMap on refugee camp mapping...)
* Have you worked with volunteers in your Open education/open data/open source/open access projects? What was your strategy of volunteer management and what are areas of improvement you see?

Speakers

Saturday November 3, 2018 5:00pm - 6:10pm
Accolade East 011

5:00pm

Open Source Research Management Platforms for Universities
Discuss university needs around research management platforms - from grant management systems to text and data repositories to discovery tools. What open source platforms already exist? What open source systems are needed? How can these open source platforms be integrated and/or modularized?

Speakers
avatar for Carly Robinson

Carly Robinson

Senior Science Advisor/ Senior Product Strategist, Science & Technology Policy Fellowships
Carly Robinson earned her Ph.D. in atmospheric chemistry from the University of Colorado, in 2013. She also holds a M.S. in atmospheric chemistry from the University of Colorado and a B.S. in applied physics and mathematics from Michigan Technological University. In addition to her... Read More →


Saturday November 3, 2018 5:00pm - 6:10pm
Accolade East 002

5:00pm

Putting the Us in Sustainability: Asking for the Community's Help in Creating a Long-Term Financial Foundation for the OpenCon Community
As OpenCon enters its fifth year, we want to ask for the community's help in transitioning OpenCon from its annual fundraising cycle to a more long-term financial foundation. OpenCon is primarily sustained by generous support from organizations that sponsor each year. The challenge with this model is that most of the budget needed to sustain the project is raised in the year it is used. While this model has been essential in getting OpenCon off the ground, it also has negative aspects: making it more difficult to provide travel scholarships and creating risk for the project if there were to be a shortfall.

This session will provide an overview of how OpenCon has been supported financially to date, ask participants to brainstorm ideas for expanding that support, and sketch out a plan for moving forward and engaging the broader community in this work.

Speakers
avatar for Nick Shockey

Nick Shockey

Director of Programs & Engagement, SPARC


Saturday November 3, 2018 5:00pm - 6:10pm
Accolade East 009

5:00pm

Support group for people who want to do community work well
As mentioned on twitter and in DEI question time, I am seeking support from people who do work similar to me: supporting a community to make a change that benefits them and also improves the system for everyone. How can we do our work well? What do we need to be aware of? How can we learn and grow together? I welcome people who identify with these questions or who have further requests and needs to gather to discuss a means for us to support each other and exchange knowledge and take part in and influence the professionalisation of community building/support work. I do not convene this session as a leader but I offer to facilitate this discussion as someone who needs the support myself!

Speakers
avatar for Naomi Penfold

Naomi Penfold

I have a PhD in neuroscience and now work to encourage the adoption of preprints in the life sciences through community building and support as Associate Director of ASAPbio


Saturday November 3, 2018 5:00pm - 6:10pm
Accolade East 008